Humans cannot contract Babesia from a dog

Piroplasmosis Infections and Babesia in Dogs
Humans cannot contract Babesia from a dog
Piroplasmosis in Humans

Humans cannot contract Babesia from a dog

Many of Piroplasmosis’s symptoms are caused by the gathering of dead red blood cells within the capillaries that feed the central nervous system, organs, and muscles. Surely, dark urine is a sign that should contribute to Piroplasmosis suspicions, but it is important to note that in 29 cases of Piroplasmosis seen by Cabinet Veterinaire International, only one patient gave us brown urine. Many Babesia carriers are asymptomatic. Others experience a rapid onset of symptoms. Yet others have been tolerating chronic symptoms for years. If your dog is experiencing any of the above symptoms, particularly if he or she spends time with outdoor dogs, we recommend testing and an immediate start to treatment (even before test results are finalized).

As noted, Cabinet Veterinaire International recommends Treatment for Piroplasmosis in the presence of any of the above-mentioned symptoms. The reason for this is that if the disease is acute, symptoms can advance so quickly that it could be too late for treatment by the time test results come back. Babesia is far more harmful than any treatment’s side effects. False negatives in testing are also possible, making precautionary treatment even more sensible.

Piroplasmosis can result in death; therefore, a prompt start to treatment is imperative. Your dog’s veterinarian will begin with a series of injectable prescriptions and follow with hydration to protect organs. A blood transfusion may be necessary. Treatment can vary widely from patient to patient and is dependent upon the dog’s general health, the severity of symptoms, and the other factors that your dog’s veterinarian may find pertinent.

There are life-threatening Complications that can Accompany Piroplasmosis, and most of them are caused by any kind of glitch in the patient’s immunity. A hardy immune system may keep Babesia in check, but if the spleen is removed or if the immune system is compromised in any way – due to age or other event – Piroplasmosis may come on suddenly and without mercy. One such case that comes to mind is of a 3-year-old fox terrier that passed away only 2 days after symptoms had become evident. The terrier’s spleen had been previously removed, making him more susceptible to the parasite’s wrath.